926 E. McDowell Road
Suite 134
Phoenix, Arizona 85006
(602) 288-0777
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FAQ

Browse F.A.Q. Topics

Billing

  • What health insurance carriers are you contracted with?

    We are contracted with the insurance companies listed below, however, each insurer has multiple specific plans and networks.  Please contact your insurance company directly to verify that your doctor is in the network for your plan.

     

    Accountable Health Plan PPO

     

    AHCCCS

     

    APIPA

     

    Care 1st

     

    Mercy Care

     

    Health Choice

     

    Health Net ACCESS

     

    Maricopa Health Plan

     

    Phoenix Health Plan

     

    State AHCCCS

     

    Aetna HMO, PPO

    AMN

     

    Foundation For Medical Care ASPA

     

    Beech Street PPO

     

    Great West HMO, PPO

     

    Multi Plan

     

    Private Healthcare Systems EPO, PPO

     

    Pro – Net PPO

     

    Banner Choice

     

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

       

    Cigna

       

    CCN

     

    First Health

     

    Health Care Consortium of Arizona

     

    Health Net

     

    Humana – PPO

     

    Mayo

     

    PacifiCare PPO, HMO

     

    PHCS

     

    Schaller Anderson HMO, Advantage, Advantage Plus

     

    Tricare/Champus

     

     United Health Care – HMO, PPO, POS, Choice Plus

    United Payors, United Providers (UPUP)
  • Who do I talk to for questions about my bill?
    You can call our billing office directly at 602-252-0859. Please read your insurance policy so you are familiar with which services are covered. This will help us as we assist you with any billing inquiries. Also while we do contact insurers for an estimate of your financial responsibility for services, insurance companies do not guarantee benefits prior to service.
  • How can I pay for my visit?
    The amount you pay for your office visit will depend on your specific insurance plan. Your co-pay is due at the time of check-in, so please be prepared to pay this amount prior to seeing your provider. We accept cash, checks, and most major credit cards. Some insurance plans have a deductible and this amount is also due at the time of check in. The remainder of your visit cost will be billed directly to your insurance carrier. Please be sure to let our office know if there have been changes in your coverage. If you do not have health care insurance, your payment is due in full on the day of service. There may be additional costs for labs and other tests that will be billed directly to you from the lab. There is a $40 fee for returned checks.

General

  • How do I find out my lab results?
    When you have lab tests performed in our office, your results will be sent to a private mail box on our patient information line. We will then contact you to let you know that you have a message to retrieve. You can call the Results Line at 602-288-0771 and follow the easy instructions to retrieve you message. Your social security number is your access code. If you do not have a message on the results line, please call our office at 602-288-0777 during normal business hours. Do not assume that the results were normal. Clarifying questions can be answered by phone. We are not able to deal with specific questions about diagnosis or treatment over the phone. If you have detailed questions, please make and appointment to discuss them with your provider. Our phone lines are open Monday through Thursday 9am-12:30pm and 2-5pm Fridays 8:30am-12:30pm and 2-4pm.
  • When can I reach someone by phone during normal business hours?
    Our hours for answering the phone are M-Th 9-12:30 and 2-5pm Fri 8:30-12:30 and 2-4. When you phone our office, please follow the prompts so your call will be directed to the employee who can help you best.
  • How do I get a refill on my prescription
    Most pharmacies will automatically fax a refill request to our office when you need a new prescription. You can also call your pharmacy directly and ask them to fax your prescription refill request to the office. A prescription refill usually takes three business days to process, however filling your prescription may take longer if it requires a prior authorization or other information from your health insurer. To avoid running out of your medication, please start the refill process well in advance of finishing your current supply of medication.
  • How do I reach someone by phone after business hours?
    We strongly encourage patients to call our office for medical problems during normal business hours, however, we recognize that problems may arise after business hours. After 5:00 p.m. daily, you can reach the provider on call through our answering service at 877-844-2858. You will be prompted to leave a message which will be sent to the doctor on-call. Please include your first and last name, date of birth, telephone number where you can be reached and a brief description of your problem. The doctor will call you back as soon as possible. No page will be sent if you do not leave a message. Please note that you may be charged for some phone calls returned to you after hours. This charge will not be billed to insurance, and you will be directly responsible for payment of this fee. Remember physicians on call overnight are responding to all patient needs including in-hospital emergencies so please restrict your after hours calls to matters requiring immediate care. Routine prescription refills, appointment scheduling and other non-urgent matters should be called in to the office on the next business day.
  • How do I get the lab tests I need?
    As a courtesy to our patients, we have a staff person drawing blood in our office. Whenever possible, your samples will be collected in our office and sent to the lab indicated by your insurance company. The lab charges are billed directly from the lab facility. Billing issues related to lab work should be addressed directly to the lab facility and/or your insurance carrier. Some lab tests may not be covered by your insurance plan and you may be responsible for the charges. Make sure you read your policy and are familiar with your coverage.

Midwifery

  • Should I See a Midwife if I am Not Pregnant?
    Many women go to their CNM or CM for annual check ups, family planning, and to get care for common infections that happen to women. For example, your midwife can answer questions about all the methods of birth control and staying healthy when not pregnant.
  • What if I Want Pain Medicine During Labor?
    Midwife means “with woman.” Your midwife will be with you during your labor and birth to give you the support and information you need. If you decide you want pain medicine during labor, your midwife can help you decide among the pain management options available and choose which option is right to meet your needs.  
  • What if I Have a “high-risk” Pregnancy or Complication During Labor?
    If you have a medical problem during pregnancy or complication during labor, your midwife will work with a doctor to make sure you get the best and safest care for you and your baby. Your midwife will also work with other health care providers: nurses, social workers, nutritionists, doulas, childbirth educators, physical therapists, and other specialists to help you get the care you need. Your CNM/CM is trained to treat common illness that you might get during pregnancy.    
  • Why Would I Choose a Midwife for Care During My Pregnancy?
      Midwives are experts in knowing the difference between normal changes that occur during pregnancy and symptoms that require extra attention. CNMs/CMs believe you need time and special attention so you can be healthy and able to take care of your baby. Midwives specialize in providing support, regular health care, and in helping you get any additional care needed.  
  • What do midwives do?
    In the United States, CNMs/CMs help over 300,000 women give birth each year. Most of these births are in hospitals. Some CNMs/CMs also care for women who decide to have their baby in freestanding birth centers and/or at home. CNMs/CMs provide health care to women all through life, including: prenatal care, birth, care after birth, care for the new baby, annual exams, birth control planning, menopause, and health counseling.   
  • What is a midwife?
    emily 52013Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) are licensed health care providers educated in nursing and midwifery. Certified midwives (CMs) are licensed health care providers educated in midwifery. CNMs and CMs have graduated from college; they have passed a national examination; and they have a licence to practice midwifery from the state they live in. Most of the midwives in the United States are CNMs or CMs. Emily Tarazi is a CNM and has privileges to take care of women at Banner University Medical Center as well as at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Phoenix.  

Pregnancy

  • Should I See a Midwife if I am Not Pregnant?
    Many women go to their CNM or CM for annual check ups, family planning, and to get care for common infections that happen to women. For example, your midwife can answer questions about all the methods of birth control and staying healthy when not pregnant.
  • What if I Want Pain Medicine During Labor?
    Midwife means “with woman.” Your midwife will be with you during your labor and birth to give you the support and information you need. If you decide you want pain medicine during labor, your midwife can help you decide among the pain management options available and choose which option is right to meet your needs.  
  • What if I Have a “high-risk” Pregnancy or Complication During Labor?
    If you have a medical problem during pregnancy or complication during labor, your midwife will work with a doctor to make sure you get the best and safest care for you and your baby. Your midwife will also work with other health care providers: nurses, social workers, nutritionists, doulas, childbirth educators, physical therapists, and other specialists to help you get the care you need. Your CNM/CM is trained to treat common illness that you might get during pregnancy.    
  • Why Would I Choose a Midwife for Care During My Pregnancy?
      Midwives are experts in knowing the difference between normal changes that occur during pregnancy and symptoms that require extra attention. CNMs/CMs believe you need time and special attention so you can be healthy and able to take care of your baby. Midwives specialize in providing support, regular health care, and in helping you get any additional care needed.  
  • What do midwives do?
    In the United States, CNMs/CMs help over 300,000 women give birth each year. Most of these births are in hospitals. Some CNMs/CMs also care for women who decide to have their baby in freestanding birth centers and/or at home. CNMs/CMs provide health care to women all through life, including: prenatal care, birth, care after birth, care for the new baby, annual exams, birth control planning, menopause, and health counseling.   
  • What is a midwife?
    emily 52013Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) are licensed health care providers educated in nursing and midwifery. Certified midwives (CMs) are licensed health care providers educated in midwifery. CNMs and CMs have graduated from college; they have passed a national examination; and they have a licence to practice midwifery from the state they live in. Most of the midwives in the United States are CNMs or CMs. Emily Tarazi is a CNM and has privileges to take care of women at Banner University Medical Center as well as at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Phoenix.  
  • What is the schedule of visits in a normal pregnancy?
    Pregnancy is a normal but altered state of health. The majority of women maintain perfect health throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Pregnancy is however a time where the body is undergoing tremendous changes and health problems can arise. As long as you and your baby are doing fine, your checkups will follow a schedule as this one:  

    From the first visit to 28 weeks Every 4 weeks From 28 to 36 weeks Every 2-3 weeks From 36 weeks to delivery Weekly

      If you develop a problem during your pregnancy, or you had a significant medical problem prior to pregnancy, you will need to see a doctor more often.    
  • What happend during my visits?

    At each visit, you will be asked to leave a urine sample, have your weight and blood pressure taken and be examined to check make sure your pregnancy is progressing normally. At certain points during the pregnancy, you will have blood tests and other specialized exams to monitor your health. Your provider will also talk to you about common concerns in pregnancy like recommended vaccines, diet and staying active during pregnancy. 

    It is a good idea to jot down your questions and concerns before each visit so they can be addressed during your visit. 

  • What are my options for birth control after delivery?
    There are several forms of contraception available to you and your partner. Before choosing a method you should consider how well the method works, how likely you are to use it, how safe it is, how much it is going to cost and how well it will fit into your lifestyle. Each method of birth control has benefits and side effects. In general, methods containing estrogen should not be started until at least six weeks after birth.  A woman who is interested in breastfeeding should make sure to establish a good milk supply by breastfeeding regularly and consistently before starting an estrogen containing method.  Progesterone only methods like Depo Provera and progesterone pills can be started immediately after birth and usually do not affect breast milk supply. Other forms of birth control include the intrauterine device or IUD and barrier methods like the diaphragm, cervical cap, condom (male and female), and spermicides. Finally there is sterilization for those women or couples who are positive they do not want any more children.  For women, there are several methods of blocking the tubes from the ovaries (fallopian tubes) to prevent pregnancy.  For men the procedure is called a vasectomy. The surgery is usually performed under local anesthesia in the doctor’s office or a clinic. (See section on birth control more more details on each method listed.) Sterilization is meant to be a permanent form of birth control.  If there is a chance you may want to have a baby later, you should not choose this method. Not having vaginal intercourse is the only method 100% effective.
  • Is sex safe during pregnancy?
    Sexual activity and intercourse are safe in a normal pregnancy. Your doctor will tell you if there are any reasons you should not be having intercourse.  
  • Should I breast or bottle- feed?
    Breastfeeding provides the right amount of all nutrients and contains antibodies that help protect baby from disease. Breastfed babies tend to be less constipated and have fewer infections and allergies. It is free, always available, the perfect temperature and requires no preparation or cleanup. Breastfeeding is good for the mother, too. The baby’s sucking releases hormones that contract the uterus, helping it return to its normal size more quickly. Breastfeeding burns calories, therefore you will lose any extra weight you gained quicker. Bottle feeding allows more versatility when it comes to who is feeding the baby. Bottle fed babies tend to go longer between feedings. It is possible to measure exactly how much your baby is getting at each feeding (however there is no way to tell exactly how much your baby needs). There are different types of formula to meet different needs. Both breast and bottle fed babies can grow up to be healthy and well adjusted. 
  • Can I get highlights, dye my hair or get my nails done?
    Yes. There is no medical evidence that any of these things is harmful to your pregnancy in any way.
  • What are some signs that I should seek medical care?
       

    There are many reasons you may need care outside your routine prenatal visits. The list below highlights some things that may arise but it does not cover all situations where you might need help.  Use your own best judgement but remember we would prefer to hear from you and reassure you rather than wish you had called.  Seek medical care if you experience any of the following:

     
    • You are less than 36 weeks pregnant and having more than 6 contractions per hour for two hours in a row or your water breaks.
    • You have vaginal bleeding more than spotting on a pad,
    • You have constant, severe pain with no relief,
    • You have fever or chills,
    • The baby seems to be moving less.

    Our number after normal business hours is 877-844-2858. For life threatening emergencies, call 911.

       
  • How do I know if I’m in labor?

    Many women have contractions before labor begins. This is sometimes called 'false labor' or  "Braxton-Hicks" contractions.  Sometimes your uterus gets hard and can be painful enough to make you think you're going into labor.  Other times you may notice a tightening of your belly  without really feeling the contractions. These contractions do some of the early work to help soften, thin, and perhaps even slightly open your cervix and they occur more often as your due date draws near.  They tend to occur in the afternoon or evening, after physical activity, or when you are tired.

     If you have contractions, rest and have some fluids.  If contractions are very painful, last more than two hours or are more than 6 in one hour and you are less than 36 weeks, go to the hospital.  Don't feel silly if you go to the hospital, sure that the big day is here, only to be sent home again.

     

     

  • What is a labor attendant?
    Most women throughout the world have used a labor attendant during childbirth. This is not a new concept and dates back to the earliest days of mankind. The ancient Greeks called their assistants "doula." This term is used by women who are trained labor assistants.   
  • Can I work while I’m pregnant?
    Working during pregnancy is usually not a problem and most women can work until delivery. However, if you have any special concerns, please call the office.  
  • Can I travel while I’m pregnant?
    Travel during pregnancy is okay but this is a situation where common sense should prevail. Long drives should be broken up so that you can get out of the car every two to three hours and walk. This will help prevent blood clots from forming in your legs. The same is true of travel by plane. Make sure you walk or vigorously move your legs every two to three hours to maintain active circulation in your legs. Traveling far away from home in the third trimester could result in having your birth in an unfamiliar place.  Use your best judgment when planning trips during pregnancy.
  • Is exercise safe during pregnancy?
    Yes. Exercise is safe during pregnancy and should not be avoided. However, there are a few considerations that need to be kept in mind. Your center of balance is constantly changing and you will need to be more careful with physical activity. Also, prolonged periods of time standing should be avoided. As your uterus grows, it will place more pressure on the large blood vessels that leave and enter your heart. The best activity for pregnant women is swimming. Other good activities for pregnant women include walking and stationary biking. Exercise reduces such discomforts as backache, constipation, fatigue and bloating. Exercise promotes muscle tone, strength, and endurance.   
  • Can I take hot baths or use a hot tub?
      Yes. There is no data that either baths or hot tubs are harmful. However, like so many other things during your pregnancy, keep things in moderation.  If you feel too hot, your baby is too hot too.   
  • Who will be there at my delivery?
    Since we are a group practice, any of the Central Phoenix Obstetrics and Gynecology physicians may be present for your delivery (Depending on night or weekend call rotations). For that reason, during your visits you will have an opportunity to meet all the providers in the office.  We make every effort to have your primary physician at your delivery but this cannot be guaranteed.  During your delivery you will also be cared for by one or more nurses and resident physicians (doctors who have completed medical school and are learning the specifics of the  obstetrics specialty) and other specialist doctors according to your needs.  Your birth may also be attended by doctors and nurses who will take care of your baby after birth.  

     

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